Prague-Paris

Joseph Šíma
František Kupka
František Muzika
Adolf Hoffmeister
Jindřich Štyrský
Toyen
Jindřich Heisler
Otta Mizera
Jan Křížek
Jiří Kolář
Běla Kolářová
Ladoslav Novák
Irena Dědičová
avril 27 2022
octobre 7 2022

Throughout the 20th century, Czech artists came to live and create in Paris in search of a certain freedom in the expression and production of their art, and beyond that just looking for freedom itself. It was a matter for them to escape from the Austro-Hungarians, and quickly thereafter, from the Communist oppression, but also from a certain provincialism in Czech art, corseted in a traditionalist iconography. This is how Paris became the haven of progressive artists who had the courage and the talent to embrace the cosmopolitan movements of the capital's avant-garde. The affiliation of these artists to the various movements that animated the debates and artistic production in the City of Lights at the beginning of the 20th century reflects their integration, their influence, and their contributions to this bubbly substrate. To be absolutely convinced, we may just name among others, Abstraction-Creation in the case of František Kupka and František Foltýn, Le Grand Jeu for Josef Šíma and even the surrealist group of Breton with Jindřich Štyrský, Toyen and Jindřich Heisler, later joined by the youngest Otto Mizera and Jan Křížek. Some of them went back home, like Adolf Hoffmeister, but, with others, Francophiles who had remained in Czechoslovakia (František Muzika, Ladislav Novák), have continued and developed their artistic works in parallel with the Parisian avant-garde. Later, especially after the occupation of Czechoslovakia in 1968, other artists like Irena Dědičová, Jiří Kolář, Běla Kolářová came to Paris with the same objective as their predecessors. Many of them, through their active participation in the creative emulation they found in Paris and their fundamental contribution to certain avant-garde movements, are now among the most sought-after Czech artists. Prague-Paris pays a tribute and justice to them, thereby opening new perspectives in understanding the development of artistic movements through the sharing of ideas and an emerging globalized art market.
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František Kupka
1871
1957 
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Joseph Šíma
1891
1971 
Joseph Sima was born on March 19, 1891, in East Bohemia. After studying painting in Prague, he moved to France, his adoptive country, in 1921. To some briefs exceptions, he remained in the capital city until his death in 1971. Between 1928 and 1932, he built a reputation as the main painter of a dissident surrealist group named Le Grand Jeu, and the author of dreamlike works as well as enigmatic portraits and landscapes. He became the favorite illustrator of Pierre Jean Jouve, Georges Ribemont-Dessaignes and Roger Gilbert-Lecomte. In 1939, he left Paris for Midi and came back only in 1945, working as a cultural attaché for free Czechoslovakia. In 1949, shortly after the communist coup in Prague, and more than 10 years later, he quit his position to go back to painting, which became darker and more underground, with touches of light in abysmal compositions. Once again, he regained a reputation as a masterful painter of light and shadow, especially thanks to the bookseller and gallerist Jean Hugues and his Parisian gallery Le Point Cardinal. In 1968, three years before his death, the Musée d’art moderne de la Ville de Paris held his first retrospective exhibition. In his native country, he is considered one of the most talented (and best priced) Czech painters of the 20th century, next to his Parisian compatriots Mucha, Kupka and Toyen.
© Aline Sima-Brumlik Archive
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František Muzika
1900
1974 
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Adolf Hoffmeister
1902
1973 
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Jindřich Štyrský
1899
1942 
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Toyen
1902
1980 
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Jindřich Heisler
1914
1953 
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Jiří Kolář
1914
2002 
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Běla Kolářová
1923
2010 
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Otta Mizera
1919
1953 
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Jan Křížek
1919
1985 
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Ladoslav Novák
1924
1999 
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Irena Dědičová
1932
1987 
●rbis pictus
The world in pictures.
The world in motion.
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75003 Paris, France
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